Midwinter Interlude Opens at the Ramsey Gallery, Sax, Drags and Rock ‘n Roll and Big Happenings for the BSO next week.

Bemidji State University Midwinter Interlude is  already installed in the Ramsey Gallery, street level off of the main parking lot of BSU’s Bangsberg Fine and Performing Arts Complex. This installation is a collection of work–crafts to fine art–by the faculty, office and maintenance staffs–is the best yet in the four-years that it has been exhibited. Try to get to the opening reception from 1-6 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 25 for refreshments, music and chit-chat with some of the artists.  Of the 22 artists, 10 are faculty and one of them is the new philosophy professor from Bulgaria Daniel Guentchev. Wood turner Dave Towley has larger works on display: bookcase, clock and lamp–very cool!  Even Andy Bartlett from the university’s public relations sector has two framed, color drawings. The exhibit will be up until March 15, and a fine use of the usually empty Ramsey Gallery space–kudos to Deb Krueger for coordinating the effort.

Bemidji Symphony Orchestra is following up on a highly successful concert on Sunday last.  With only two weeks between concerts, the upcoming “Music and Peace” performance will again prove how fortunate we are to enjoy Beverly Everett’s ability to put the right people together at the right time to present an outstanding event for music lovers. Early in the week, Native-American flutist Keith Bear will arrive in Minnesota to spend time with youngsters from Red Lake, Bemidji and environs for special in-school presentations. A special BSO concert for over 1,000 grade-school youth will be performed next Wednesday (sorry, not open to the public).  Bear will spin stories of his native culture interspersed with flute melodies. On Sunday, March 3, both Keith Bear and composer/narrator Linda Tutas Haugen will perform a rendition of “The Old Turtle.”  Grants from Region 2 Arts Council Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund and Target have made this Keith Bear/Linda Tutas Haugen residency possible. Parents, please do not pass up this opportunity for your school age children as they are admitted free to the BSO concerts.

Lord of the Dance this Sunday at the Sanford Center—if you haven’t heard the promos or seen the ads–you’re not paying attention. Tickets will be available at the door for the 3:30 show—don’t pass up this chance to see a show that would normally take a trip to the cities or farther to enjoy this extravaganza of Gaelic myth, music and fantasy–with dancing that will astound you.

That’s all she wrote folks, hope to see you at some event this  weekend.  Love Songs and Arias at the Hampton and a Sax, Drags and Rock ‘n Roll at the Beaux Arts Ballroom at 7:30 p.m., Friday. Admission–free for students but be sure to bring along a non-perishable food item for the food shelf. A free will donation will be accepted.

 

 

 

Love Songs and Arias and Lord of the Dance

LOVE SONGS AND ARIAS with some returning artists will be a evening of song interspersed with dinner courses. I know, they like to say, dinner with song selections between the courses but I much prefer the musical interludes.  And this one coming up on Feb 23 at the Hampton Inn promises to be among the favorites of these nights. An event of the Loon Opera Company, Kirk Dougherty, the tenor who played Pinkerton in “Madama Butterfly will be joined by another soloist from that production, Allison LaPointe who played Suzuki. A new person who will be appearing for this evening of entertainment, will be soprano Momoko Tanno. Betsy Downs will be the fourth singer to join the group in renditions of arias from Puccini to interpretations of Gershwin classics.

The ticket price of $50 includes dinner with menu selections of filet of beef in a red wine demi glace; chicken a la vodka or plat de vega, all accompanied with asiago potatoes and haricot vert almondine. The evening would not be complete without a decadent chocolate dessert   Call Abe Hunter at 218-368-8805 by the deadline Feb. 19

LORD OF THE DANCE is making a stop in Bemidji while on a national tour. The original Lord of the dance, Michael Flatley is an American born step dancer, who brought Irish dance to the forefront. Flatley, although no longer a dancer—the Guinness Book of World Records cites him as having the world’s fastest feet—serves as artistic director of LOD.  Having seen them perform in England and New York, I can only say DON’T MISS IT!

Tickets are already on sale for the 3:30 p.m. performance on Sunday, Feb 24 at the Sanford Center. Tickets are $45 for premium reserved seating, $30 for reserved seating and $20 for Arena Bowl Seating. This show will not go to the Alerus in Grand Forks but it will be in the cities. So catch it while you can.  More color to come on this event in the near future.

 “SORDID LIVES,” a comedy by Del Shores will be the next Saarens’ production. A dinner-theater show that will include a Texas barbeque dinner–what else would you expect from a a bunch of Texans like Kevin Cease, Mitch Blessing, Chuck Deeter, Sarah Einerson (who is a transplanted Texan), Julie Kasier, Kathryn Lavelle, Andor Lofthus, Bridget Looper, Julie Quanrud, Steve Saari, Vicki Stenerson, Joel Ward and another true southern gal, Cheryl Winnett.

It’s an adult comedy with out-there adult themes so don’t even think about taking the kids. The comedy takes us into the lives of various “characters,” the Sordids and their friends. There was a movie made and,  if you goggle the title, you can get a good idea of the plot line.

Tickets need to be reserved at least one week in advance of the Feb. 21-23 dinner show at the Hungry Bear Conference Center. Ticket price includes dinner and play for a mere $32.50—a 10% discount is available for parties of 8 or more.

Call 556-1777 or send a check to Saarens Productions, 508 Woodland Ave. SW. Bemidji 56601.

The show is directed by DeeJay Arrens, and, yes, there will be a vegetarian option—cheese manicotti.

 

Arts Advocates meet with Senator, Lord of the Dance coming to Bemidji and “Sordid Lives.”

I spent Saturday morning covering the meet and greet with Sen. Saxhaug and members of the Bemidji and environs arts reps at BCAC in the Carnegie Library. It took about a hour for the people to introduce themselves and tell why they were there to see the senator. Because of the space limitations for the Sunday article, I had to cull with “surgical precision” the many quotations that I recorded during the meeting. It’s always chancy quoting one person and not another, so please do not be offended if your comments don’t make it to the blog either.

But there were a few moments that gave me pause; when Wesley May, painter and Native American advocate and volunteer, came to stand before Saxhaug, introduce himself and shake the senator’s hand.  May stood tall among the crowd.

When Nancy Cole, Region 2 rep from Lake of the Woods thanked the senator for the funding her region has received to re-make their old depot. That funding has changed the lives of so many people in an area so bereft of cultural opportunities.

Bead artist Delina White from Bugonaygeshig School told of how the funds enabled her students to attend plays at the Reif Center in Grand Rapids—an opportunity they might not otherwise enjoy.

Marilyn Miller, board chair of the Bemidji Area Arts Endowment, who spoke of the nearly $12,000 in funds awarded yearly in Bemidji through BAAE for music lessons and arts activities. Money she told the senator that came from private donors who wanted to help supplement the arts grants.

Audrey Thayer who spoke of “Art from Within,” an initiative of the ACLU to give a voice to those who are or were incarcerated and their families.

Saxhaug was patient and listened attentively, looking only at his clip board to write a comment. I believe that everyone there felt that they were heard; a job well done by the organizers, participants and special guest.

 

LORD OF THE DANCE is making a stop in Bemidji while on a national tour. The original Lord of the dance, Michael Flatley is an American born step dancer, who brought Irish dance to the forefront. Flatley, although no longer a dancer—the Guinness Book of World Records cites him as having the world’s fastest feet—serves as artistic director of LOD.  Having seen them perform in England and New York, I can only say DON’T MISS IT!

Tickets are already on sale for the 3:30 p.m. performance on Sunday, Feb 24 at the Sanford Center. Tickets are $45 for premium reserved seating, $30 for reserved seating and $20 for Arena Bowl Seating. This show will not go to the Alerus in Grand Forks but it will be in the cities. So catch it while you can.  More color to come on this event in the near future.

 “SORDID LIVES,” a comedy by Del Shores will be the next Saarens’ production. A dinner-theater show that will include a Texas barbeque dinner–what else would you expect from a a bunch of Texans like Kevin Cease, Mitch Blessing, Chuck Deeter, Sarah Einerson (who is a transplanted Texan), Julie Kasier, Kathryn Lavelle, Andor Lofthus, Bridget Looper, Julie Quanrud, Steve Saari, Vicki Stenerson, Joel Ward and another true southern gal, Cheryl Winnett.

It’s an adult comedy with out-there adult themes so don’t even think about taking the kids. The comedy takes us into the lives of various “characters,” the Sordids and their friends. There was a movie made and,  if you goggle the title, you can get a good idea of the plot line.

Tickets need to be reserved at least one week in advance of the Feb. 21-23 dinner show at the Hungry Bear Conference Center. Ticket price includes dinner and play for a mere $32.50—a 10% discount is available for parties of 8 or more.

Call 556-1777 or send a check to Saarens Productions, 508 Woodland Ave. SW. Bemidji 56601.

The show is directed by DeeJay Arrens, and, yes, there will be a vegetarian option—cheese manicotti.

 

Bemidji Baroque Ensemble with Patrick Riley, et al and some thoughts on Josh Boock

This morning I had the chance and just sit and talk with Patrick Riley, to my mind, one of the most versatile and competent musicians in Bemidji and environs. Patrick retired from his teaching position at BSU after 40-years on the tenured staff but is still actively plying his musical craft with a number of groups. And speaking of craft, Riley is working out of his new woodworking shop and selling his work through Shop 426 at BCAC.

Because we are relatively new to Bemidji, it is always fun to listen to someone who can tell us about “the old days.”

Riley reminisced about the days when violinist Ann Hayes taught her string students in the basement of the Bemidji Community Arts Center. Riley named BCAC as one of the two local organizations that have been stalwarts in promoting a vibrant arts scene in Bemidji. The obvious second is HSMA.

“When the Olson Schwartz Funeral Home moved from downtown, Ann Hayes bought the building and started the Headwaters School of Music and the Arts (1997),” said Riley. “When we moved there, I could still smell embalming fluid, a scent I was familiar with because my step-father was a mortician, laughed Riley.”

The reason for our chat this a.m. was the upcoming Bemidji Baroque concert on Sunday. The original people are still together after 35 years of playing and performing: Margaret Maxwell on harpsichord, Natalie Roholt on flute and Riley on violoncello. For this concert, Melanie Hanson, adjunct string professor at BSU and concert master for the BSO will be joining them.

The program is: “Sonata for Flute in B minor, HWV 376 by Handel;

A selection of music for solo harpsichord with Maxwell;

“Trio Sonata in G major, BWV 1039 by Bach;

A selection of music for solo cello and

“Paris Quartet No. 8 in A minor” by Telemann.

The 3 p.m. concert is free but small children are not encouraged to attend.

 

I cannot let this time pass without mentioning the untimely passing of ceramicist Josh Boock. Just this last fall, I wrote a feature piece on Josh after visiting his studio just outside Grace Lake. His yard was filled with boxes of his work and we went through a few of them until I found the pieces I wanted to get that day.  A face mug with an extended lip for placing a used tea bag—my son-in-law jumped for joy when he opened it at Christmas. A plate with some new techniques Josh was experimenting with that I bought for someone else but I can’t part with it now.

I do have the photos  taken that day along with some video that his parents will receive in the near future. When I played the video, and heard his voice, it was time to say good-bye to this fragile genius.

I hope that Josh’s parents will be able to play the video for his daughter someday because she is too young to have lasting memories of him. A man who told me that being a dad was the best thing in his life.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Multifaceted Dymond

When Joanna Dymond and I met for an interview this week, she brought
along a folio of all the promos she designed and wrote for an upcoming
show being produced by Norman Lear, “Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman? for
WNEW, New York. We paged through the materials: promos for TV Guide,
on-air commercials and press releases for a show that she was trying  to get into syndication; heady stuff for the girl from Bagley, MN. We laughed and reminisced about life in my home town; a far cry from the farm she was born on or the town she called home. But listening to her stories of how she came to be the Director of Public Relations,
Advertising and On-Air Promotions for a New York station, Channel 5 was fun, truly funny and utterly fascinating.

Somewhere along the way, Dymond has latched onto the serendipity of life; its textures and hues. The death of a close friend drove her from small-town America to the big city Wayzata which was her first foray into corporate America. A request from a stranger who wanted a traveling companion on the drive to California was answered with a adventurous “yes” and off Dymond went to seek her fortune. Describing her first view of San Francisco as looking like “heaven on earth,” she stayed at that heaven long enough to finish a Bachelor of Arts degree from San Francisco State and live across the hall from the then
fledgling director Francis Ford Coppola.

Dymond’s story of how she went to New York City to be interviewed for a public relations position and being put-up at the luxurious Waldorf Astoria Hotel in the “royal” suite by mistake had us both laughing. After Dymond enjoyed an evening, entertaining friends with hot chocolate and cookies, in the same suite that the Duke and Duchess of Windsor used, the next morning management informed her, that they had made a mistake in assigning that suite to her. Perhaps the mistake was due to the fact that she arrived in NYC sans business suit, hat, gloves (kid skin, of course) hose and heels. They probably assumed that anyone who came into that luxurious hotel wearing slacks, sweater and flats was wealthy enough to defy convention. Dymond did not get that position but she did go to England for a year to work at a television station and was lured back to the States and New York City for her next challenge.

I think that there’s a memoir in there for Dymond to pen, I hope there  is for her expertise in the field of advertising and public relations in network television is admirable, enviable and fun to listen to. I was struck at how Dymond is able to laugh at herself without blaming others for missteps along the way.

And now a little about the show she was trying to “sell” to the networks. Most times truth is stranger than fiction but in the case of “Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman,” a syndicated television show circa 1976-77, fiction was truth. Truth being what Mary saw in commercials and what she read in her “ladies” magazines. Mary was always puzzled by the yellow waxy build-up in the corners of her kitchen because she followed all the advice she got from the experts writing in those mags. “Hartman” was in the same genre as other Norman Lear prime time comedies: “All in the Family,” “The Jeffersons” and “Maude”; provoke serious discussion from the absurd by exposing racial bigotry, stereotypical characters and real life situations which called for decisions not always acceptable at the time. But the big difference was that “Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman” came on at 11 p.m., after the 10 p.m. news with Bill Jorgenson, and played to an adult audience.

The show exploded social taboos, and story lines went from her impotent  blue-collar husband, a serious topic at the time, pre-Viagra, to Mary accidentally causing the death of her friend’s husband with her chicken soup. Just goggle Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman and you will find YouTube excerpts from the shows. The most interesting is the one that Lear  cites as being one of the best acting on the tube: Mary is on the David Susskind Show (not a talk show but rather a show of intellectuals sparing to destroy the guest) and has a meltdown. Remember, shows were live back then. Another host, Dick Cavett, once asked if there was a doctor in the audience for one of his guests seemed to have died, yes, that’s true and the man did expire on the couch.

Joanna Dymond is hosting a book signing of her first mystery, “Crazy as a Loon,” this Saturday, Dec. 1, at Brigid’s Pub from 3 to 5 p.m. with music and songs from her DJ days, music from the Tell Sisters, poetry and a “just plain good time.” See you downtown on Saturday!

If You’ve Ever Wondered What Happens After Happily Ever After

Just be careful what you wish for because you might not be prepared for the result! Fairy tales are just that; tales that make the heroes heroic and the rescued maidens happy ever after. If you want to see and hear what really happens after “happily ever after,” run (do not walk) to see the last two performances of this year’s Bemidji High School musical, “Into the Woods,” by Stephen Sondheim and James Lapines. The show is a musical look at personal behaviors, social mores and basic motives. Directed by Jeremiah Liend with Derek Wickum and his mighty pit band, and technical support by Gregg Willimek, the show is a delight for the eyes, a treat for the ears and nourishment for the intellect. Sondheim, known for his cerebral lyrics, is at his best in this, my favorite musical, because every time I see it—and that has been many times—I learn something new or some conundrum is solved. Liend chose his leads carefully and they command the stage—staying true to their character (Libby Sorenson as Red Riding Hood and Isaac Flaa as Jack made it seem natural). Feature players Jamiee Lusby and Jadie Hunt captured the personalities of Cinderella’s silly sisters to the delight of the audience. Hannah Allen grew into the role of the Wicked Witch as the show progressed and it was her tour de force at the end. All of the players deserve recognition for they understood the story line and were vested in the performance. Get there—there’s a lot of seats to fill and I guarantee a fine evening’s entertainment by local youth starting at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday at BHS.  Tickets at the door, $6 adults and $3 for students K-12, but there are some adult themes so would not recommend for younger than middle-school students.

“Oliver!” opens this week at the historic Chief Theater in downtown Bemidji with local talent and a significant number of family participants. The show is a collaboration of Bemidji Community Theater and the Paul Bunyan Playhouse and follows up on the outstanding success of last year’s “A Christmas Carol,” another Charles Dicken’s classic story. The Fulton Family are all on stage together and this show the Saxton Family came together to support the sibling playing Oliver, Tommy Saxton. The Conklin’s are on the boards with dad Paul playing the evil Fagin and that’s just three families who are enjoying the hard work and satisfaction of “jobs” well done together. Performances are at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 9, 10, 16 and 17, with Sunday matinees at 2 p.m. Nov. 11 and 18, all at the historic Chief Theater.Tickets are $12 for adults and $6 for attendees ages 17 and younger. Tickets can be purchased at Iverson Corner Drug, Ken K. Thompson Jewelry and at the box office.
Attendees are encouraged to bring a non-perishable food item for the Bemidji Food Shelf to receive a $1 ticket price refund.

Congratulations to local artist Dawn Standera and jazz guitarist Lou Samsa for receiving the Region 2 Arts Council/McKnight Career Development Fellowships.  Standera, a fiber artist, will mentor with Norman Sherfield to study techniques of three-dimensional fiber sculptures. Samsa will produce a multi-media instructional video for guitar; he has a previously published instruction book on learning how to play a guitar.

Don’t forget about the Choral Festival this Sunday at BSU—details are in the Sunday Pioneer Previews.

I need to prepare for a phone interview with Michael W. Smith which will happen in a few minutes so, that’s she wrote! Thanks for tuning in to the arts blog.

“Out of the Hat, VII,” Eric Bergsven’s Senior Recital at BSU, Arts and Crafts and Fundraisers.

Even though the weather did not fully cooperate last weekend, Bemidjians and visitors were bustling around town and through the woods for the First City of the Arts Studio Cruise. It was great the see the visitors to our town enjoying the public art while they walked around town, unmindful of the drizzle. One group of young women came up from the cities to enjoy a get-away weekend and take the cruise. Well done–thanks to the organizers including the steering committee, the artists, local businesses and all those who contributed financially to support this event.

“Out of the Hat, VII,” with Cheryl Winnett will be on-stage at the Paul Bunyan Playhouse starting at 8 p.m. Saturday.  Six short plays will be produced by local authors, directors, actors and techies. Tickets are on sale now for $10 each at Brigid’s Pub, Iverson’s and Harmony Food Co-op. Although the promise is to limit language this year, the program is still for mature audiences.

The first time we ever saw Eric Bergsven was when he was in Bemidji High School  and one of the leading character’s in Cate Belleveau’s production of “Les Miserables.” Eric stood at the top of the barricades and sang. I was taken aback at the costume that I built but never saw worn until that day.  Eric went to BSU to study voice, transferred for a year to a college in ND and then came back to BSU to finish his degree. Many have seen him sing/perform in memorable productions like the “Sophie Scholl” play that was written and performed at BSU under the direction of Patrick Carrier. Sophie was a young German student who was involved with the White Rose non-violent protests in Nazi Germany. Eric also performed for the “Love Songs and Arias” fundraisers for the Loon Opera Company and last summer appeared in their “Madama Butterfly.” Long story short, Eric will be singing his senior recital on Saturday night at 7:30 p.m. in Thompson Recital Hall and it would be great if we could fill the house—it’s free to the public so it’s consumer friendly. Congratulations Eric and here’s a good wish for you to be successful in your career choice.

If you are out and about this weekend, be sure to stop by the fundraiser for La Voce Ballo at the Bemidji Armory. The rummage sale will run from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

The Third Annual Fall Bazaar will be held from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday in Northern Town Hall. Fine arts and crafts (wood products, knitted items, pottery, paintings, etc.)  will be on sale for early Christmas buying or that little something you can’t pass by nor pass on to someone else.

If you have an arts activity  that you want printed in the arts blog, please send the information along to me at prall@bemidjipioneer.com. BUT, do not think that because it’s happens every year, month or week that it will be printed. I will work with you but you need to do your part in letting me (us) know what’s happening. Thanks for reading and “that’s all she wrote.”

 

Artist and Poet Marley Kaul, Recent Incidents of Damage to Sculpture Walk Installations

     Marley was candid about his love of poetry and how it has influenced his painting from youth. In the picture below, “Waiting for the Petals to Fall,” it looks simply like a bunch of red poppies in a container against a background of vibrant colors: striking and yet the juxtaposition of the colors and the repeated lines within the flowers give the viewer a feeling of conflict or unease..
Marley spoke about how he paints a poppy each year and his poppies relate back to hearing a poem although he could not remember the author. A little research has turned up the poem, “In Flanders Field” by Lt. Col. John M. McCrae, M.D. a Canadian doctor who tended to the British troops in a small Flemish village after they succumbed to a German chemical attack in 1915. McCrae was so disheartened by the massive loss of young men that he penned the following lines which appeared anonymously in London’s “Punch.”

“In Flanders fields the poppies blow

Between the crosses, row on row

That mark our place, and in the sky

The lark, still bravely singing, fly

Scarce heard amid the guns below.”

To get the complete poem, go to PoemHunter.com. It was written during the Great War, now referred to as WWI. America’s Lt. John Philip Sousa collaborated with Dr. McCrae and composed the music for the poem.
Marley also spoke about American poet Robert Bly and the importance of poetry in his own life; he reads poetry every day before starting to paint. Bly’s work that Kaul refers to in the video is the “Iron John” series. This book of poetry is about men, published in 1990 by Addison Wesley, and is the best known of all Bly’s works.
Marley’s precise comment about poetry is, “If I could write, I’d be a poet.” Marley, you are a poet in every way—you write with brush and pigment.

 Please, listen up folks!  We had another incident of damage to an installation. This time is was Roger Loyson’s, “Cosmic Spheres.” It is regrettable that some in this town do not recognize the gift of public art that the Bemidji Sculpture Walk brings to this community. Another installation, “Sparky” has been repeatedly damaged.
What is even more regrettable is that no one has notified the police while the damage was being done. No one stopped the person doing the damage. No one reminded the person that they were destroying another person’s private property and finally no one stood up for the Bemidji community at large. It would be disappointing to us Bemidjians if the SWC had to discontinue the public art because no artist would put their work in jeopardy of malicious destruction.
Please stand up for what makes this community the great place it is to live and bring up families.

Siblings from Thief River Falls with BSO, Tom Halverson Fantasy Image and Roy C. Booth’s newest publication.

 

It seems to be a fact that I hear over and over from those accomplished in the arts—they started at an early age. This Sunday’s concert by the Bemidji Symphony Orchestra is “Music and Change,” the first concert of the 74th season “Tunes and Topics!” will begin at 2 p.m. in the Bemidji High School auditorium. Two promising young adults from Thief River Falls, Brett (17) and Brayden (15) Drevlow will be the featured players and they will be supported musically by their other siblings Brianna, a piano performance major at Concordia, and string player Brock. These young players are a good example of the opportunities available in this often thought-of “little corner of the world.”

Both young men began to study music in grade school, Brayden started lessons in kindergarten when he was five-years-old and he studies now with Marcia Knuttila of Thief River Falls and has taken master classes with BSU’s Stephen Carlson, Professor Jay Hershberger of Concordia College, Professors Kay Carlson and Alexander Chernyshev, from the U of MN, Morris and Duluth respectively. At 15, Brayden is already a Minnesota Music Teacher Association certified piano teacher in Thief River Falls. And I neglected to mention that he also studies violin (which he started at 6 in the first grade) with Derek Druse of TRF.

Brother Brett studies Bass with Prof. Greg Hamilton of Concordia, piano with Knuttila and is also a MMTA certified piano teacher. Both teens play with the BSO and the Greater Grand Forks Symphony and in their “spare time” attend Lincoln H.S., are on the Speech Team, play in the school orchestra, sing in the choir and perform with the Swingsations Jazz chorale ensemble. Along with being the two eldest boys in a family of 11, they are also Eagle Scouts. Are you impressed yet? Whether you are now and will be on Sunday when you see and hear them play, please make an effort to get to the concert. Season tickets will also be available. You can get tickets now at Lueken’s Village Foods at both locations Brigid’s Pub in downtown Bemidji or online at brownpapertickets.com: $20 for adults, $15 for seniors 62+, $10 for college students and free for students K through 12. All seats are general admission

Bemidji Artist Tom Halverson has released a 300+ image volume of his fantasy fairy artwork the Kindle and Kindle Fire HD now on the Kindle Store. Fairies and Magical Creatures of The Art of Tom Halverson is a compilation of more than 300 images from his original fantasy portrait paintings and drawings. Halverson has been a featured artist on public television and has been illustrated children’s books for over 15 years. His web site is www.tomhalverson.com.

 

Roy C. Booth will have three of his short stories published in anthologies by Scarlett River Press of Lindsay, Ontario.

 

Another Try at Getting the Links to Work: New and newly published works from DeeJay Arens, June Kramin, Jim Proebstle, Roy C. Booth and Nicholas Johnson, Gordon Sirvio and Jess Lourey

Gordon Sirvio, who writes as S. A. Gorden, was the focus of an article on the Expressions page, September 6 wrote an email to say that his book, “Eyes of an Eagle” is out in an electronic version. As the article stated, his first book in the sci-fi trilogy (Eagle) was taken to the International Space Station for the NASA recreational library. The next two installments (Eyes of a Cat and Eyes of a Seeker) will be out in electronic form in a few weeks. Direct sales links can be had at TaconiteRunes.com when Barnes and Noble and Amazon send the electronic versions to Sirvio. The price will be $4.99. Click here to email Servio for up to date information.

 “Fatal Incident,” by Jim Proebstle is based on the true story of a military air disaster in 1944. This WWII historical fiction story of conspiracy, espionage and human emotions is based on the true story of an unresolved military air disaster in Alaska with the pilot who came from Cass Lake. Readers can see a few of the original photographs taken by the recovery team at www.jimproebstle.com or click here to access.

Roy C. Booth and former Bemidji resident Nicholas Johnson announce that their steampunk mystery thriller, “Sherlock Holmes and the Case of the Man Made Vacuum” has been accepted for publication by Scarlett River Press of Canada.  The book is a re-imaging of Doyle’s world famous detective and also features characters and references from the works of Charles Dickens, R. L. Stevenson, H. G. Wells and Mary Shelley among others.

The book is also an adaptation of a full length play that the duo hopes to produce in the future. A prolific writer, Booth’s publications can be found on Amazon.com/Kindle, Goodreads or just goggle his name (Roy C. Booth) for a complete listing of all work already in print.

DeeJay Arens first book has been nominated for three literary awards. “The View from a Rusty Train Car,” is a coming of age story which revolves around two gay teens who struggle with their sexual identity and trying to be what others expect them to be. Aren promises that this story is unlike any you have read before and one that you will not soon forget. The book is available in either print or digital. Click here to access the website for Writers Amuse Me Publishing.

Former Bemidji resident June Kramin who was featured during the 2012 Bemidji Book Festival has a new release, “Come and Talk to Me.” Her work can be accessed at the Writers Amuse me website, link above.

Jess Lourey is at it again with “December Dread,” the latest Murder-By-Month Mystery. Lourey’s stories continue to gain in sophistication and good crime stories and this one is the best yet. As I said before, watch out Stephanie Plum for the new girl in town, Miranda (Mira) James is hot on your heels. Click here to access the printer. Just in case you don’t recognize the reference, Plum is the main character in Janet Evanovich’s sleuth series.

So, o.k. it is said that summer time should be given over to reading but with such a short summer season here, reading can be saved for the indoor months. Enjoy them all—whenever or where ever you want, but please, try to read at least one of these books.